SOLAR POWER ORANGE COUNTY, SOLAR POWER ORANGE COUNTY CA, ORANGE COUNTY SOLAR POWER ENERGY, FREE SOLAR POWER, Residential Solar Power, Commercial Solar Power, Solar Power


For SOLAR POWER IN ORANGE COUNTY - Call Today (949) 488-3207
FREE Solar Power For Orange County California!
, Zero Down, Free Estimate
"The solar market is projected to grow 35 percent a year for the next three to five years." -Walter Nasdeo
Residential Solar Energy, Commercial Solar Energy, Free Solar Energy (Zero Down), Reduce Your Electric Bills With Solar Power, Mico-Inverters
 

Solar Power
Orange County
CA
.com


Zero Down Solar Made Easy!

BRIAN
POWERS
CONSTRUCTION

& SOLAR POWER

23632 Via Fabricante, Suite F
Mission Viejo, CA 92691


CALL US TODAY
(949) 488-3207

To Email Us: "Click Here"

Email:

READ OUR REVIEWS

Read About us On:
GOOGLE
YAHOO
INCREDELICIOUS



GREAT ARTICLES:
ARTICLE 1:
3 Types of Photovoltaic Solar Panels - What are the Differences? ! (11,210 Views)
ARTICLE 2:
Solar Panel Installation Procedure (1,321 Views)
ARTICLE 3:
Solar Inverter diagram circuit, Power Inverter diagram circuit (836 Views)
ARTICLE 4:
Alternative Energy Solutions In A Time Of Power Crisis (1,252 Views)
ARTICLE 5:
Difference between monocrystalline polycrystalline and Amorphous thin film solar cell? (1,267 Views)
ARTICLE 6:
Solar Panel Installation Manual (265 Views)
ARTICLE 7:
What is MPPT Solar Controller? (559 Views)
ARTICLE 8:
"Solar Power Your Home For Dummies" Pdf Download - Shocking News ! (948 Views)
 
ACADEMIC ARTICLES:
ARTICLE 1:
About Solar Power
ARTICLE 2:
About Solar Energy
ARTICLE 3:
About Renewable Energy
ARTICLE 4:
About Active Solar
ARTICLE 5:
About Solar Water Heating
ARTICLE 6:
About Photovoltaic System
ARTICLE 7:
About Off-the-grid
ARTICLE 8:
About Stand-Alone Power System
ARTICLE 9:
About Solar Micro-Inverter
ARTICLE 10:
About Solar Inverter
ARTICLE 11:
About Solar Tracker
ARTICLE 12:
About Concentrator Photovoltaics
ARTICLE 13:
About Sunlight
ARTICLE 14:
About Photovoltaic Effect
ARTICLE 15:
About Light
ARTICLE 16:
About Solar Cell
ARTICLE 17:
About Photovoltaic thermal hybrid solar collector
ARTICLE 18:
About Flexible solar cell research
ARTICLE 19:
About Thin-film solar cell
ARTICLE 20:
About Solar power in California
ARTICLE 21:
About HERO Program
ARTICLE 22:
About PACE financing
ARTICLE 23:
About Solar power in the United States
ARTICLE 24:
List of photovoltaics companies
ARTICLE 25:
Zero Energy Building
ARTICLE 26:
Passive Solar
ARTICLE 27:
About Polymer solar cell
ARTICLE 28:
About Solar City
ARTICLE 29:
About Orange County
ARTICLE 30:
About Mission Viejo
 

NOTE: The information and notices contained on this website are intended as general research and information and are expressly not intended, and should not be regarded, as medical, financial or legal advice. The articles are from free sources.


Awarded

Best Value in SOLAR POWER

Orange County CA, Visit: OrangeCountyCA
BusinessDirectory.com
 
 

"I'd put my money on the Sun and Solar Energy, what a source of Power! I hope we don't have to wait until oil and coal run out, before we tackle that." -Thomas Edison

"Solar energy is a clean alternative energy source. It's clear, given the current energy crisis, that we need to embrace new sources of renewable energy that are good for our planet. I believe very strongly in using technology to provide affordable options that all consumers can put into practice." -Yang Yang UCLA Engineering Professor

"We were delighted to have worked with Microsoft on its electric solar system. Microsoft is effectively lowering operating costs, reducing purchases of expensive peak electricity, and improving the health and quality of life in California through its Silicon Valley Campus solar power program." -Dan Shuga President of PowerLight

 

 

.
 

Welcome To
Solar Power Orange County
GET YOUR FREE ESTIMATE TODAY!


ITS LIKE FREE
SOLAR ENERGY FOR YOUR HOME
ZERO DOWN SOLAR POWER MADE EASY!


New solar funds make going solar more affordable than ever.
Solar Power Orange County can Design, Install and Finance your solar system.

Call your solar pro, Brian Powers at Solar Power Orange County!

It's easy to see if you qualify for Zero Down Solar.
It is important to first find out if you qualify for our service. Only about 30% of homeowners actually qualify, but those who do begin saving immediately. Take a second to answer these questions.

 
Is Your current electric bill over $150 per month?

Does your house have a south or west facing roof?

 

Do you have minimal shading from trees or buildings?


Is your credit score 700 or higher or own your home (Hero Program)

If you answered YES to all four questions, your house is one step closer to being eligible for a solar system with ZERO MONEY DOWN!

No upfront costs
We purchase the system for you. You never make a payment. You do not pay for the system, permits, installation, or any other system startup costs.

No Maintenance
Since we own the system, we maintain it. It is connected to the internet and notifies us if anything goes wrong and we respond quickly to fix any issue(s). We guarantee our electric service!

You save money from day one
Once your system is connected, the cost of your electricity drops to your new, low, solar rate. You do not need to wait years for a return on investment. There is no investment and immediate savings!

Protect against increasing energy costs
Energy costs have been growing at high rates over the past three decades and are projected to keep increasing. Solar offers you secure protection from these rate increases in the future.


Solar Power Orange County Has
Your Solutions

CALL US TODAY (949) 488-3207

Specialists in Solar Power

THE BASICS


Residential and Commercial Solar Electric
Solar Power Orange County, Inc. specializes in residential and commercial solar electric systems with a General Contractor's Class B License and Solar Contractor's C46 License. They install quickly, with above code processes and the highest quality equipment. Solar Power Orange County combines technical expertise, project management experience, exceptional customer service, and state of the art engineering to create a fully integrated solar package
.

Save Money From Day One
You can save money from day one, with no money down, no upfront fees and no maintenance. Solar Power Orange County offers a simple Solar as a Service Program, where they take care of everything. Start saving today by generating your own power, thanks to the sun and your Solar Power Orange County installation. Brian Powers is the man to see at Solar Power Orange County
.

 

QUESTIONS ON SOLAR POWER,
CALL US TODAY
(949) 488-3207



Save Money From
Day One

MOVE TOWARD ENERGY SELF-SUFFICIENCY!

Are you shocked by the cost of electricity for your home or for your business? The cost of electricity can be substantially lower or even non-existent when you install a solar energy system with Solar Power Orange County.

You can purchase and have Solar Power Orange County install or you can put no money down and pay by the month. We guarantee that your new energy bill, no matter how you buy, will be saving you substantial money from Day One. Call Brian Powers at Solar Power Orange County today and start saving substantial money!

Simply pay a low monthly bill and save. The system performance and savings are guaranteed. And, your savings will increase every year. As electricity costs go up, your solar installation will save you even more. Solar Power Orange County can provide these savings for you .

The installation and maintenance is free. A 20-Year 100% warranty is available. Solar Power Orange County will monitor the system for you. They thought of it all. With your solar installation, you are on the path to energy self-sufficiency while at the same time, going green. Why rely on a public system that will cost you that much more next year? Their methods pollute; yours will be environmentally friendly. Control your own energy destiny. Call Brian Powers at Solar Power Orange County to start on your path to savings today!


GET YOUR FREE ESTIMATE TODAY!

CALL US TODAY
(949) 488-3207

HERE IS HOW IT WORKS:

We are with you every step of the way on your path to lower electricity costs.
Here is how it works...


Evaluate
We conduct a Residential Electricity Service Analysis in which our technician evaluates your property to determine if our service is a good fit for you and your home.


Qualify
Once we analyze the results, we provide you with your new electricity rate and the amount you will be saving each month.

Save
Once installed, you immediately begin paying for your electricity at the new, flat, wholesale rate.

GET YOUR FREE ESTIMATE TODAY!

CALL US TODAY
(949) 488-3207

THE HERO PROGRAM

MOVE TOWARD ENERGY SELF-SUFFICIENCY!


It depends on your electricity use and system size.

To get a rough idea of how much you could save, take a peek at some estimates for two houses with rooftop solar systems that offset electricity costs by 80% to 90%.

3-bedroom example The biggest electricity costs of a house this size typically come from running the AC and laundry all the time. Installing a 3.75kW solar system would lower their electric bill significantly.

$153 bill before solar
$31 bill after solar

5-bedroom example Having both a home office and a swimming pool can leave a household this size with a hefty monthly electric bill. Installing a 4kW solar system would bring down their bill quite a bit.

$325 bill before solar
$65 bill after solar

Financing through HERO Financing the purchase of a solar system through the HERO Program, or other lending program, gives you the benefits of owning it without upfront expense. This option offers both financial benefits, as well as costs, but includes valuable consumer protections and typically maximizes your long-term savings.

It's not based on credit score. Approvals for the HERO Program are primarily based on the equity in your home.

It requires no money down. HERO finances 100% of your project cost, with fixed rates and flexible terms of 5-20 years.

You have the final say. Our contractors have agreed to be paid only after you sign off that the project is complete to your satisfaction.

GET YOUR FREE ESTIMATE TODAY!
CALL US TODAY
(949) 488-3207

 
 


REVIEWS & Testimonials:
What People are Saying About Solar Power Orange County...

"EXCEEDED MY EXPECTATIONS!"

"We made the right decision in choosing Solar Power Orange County, a Premier SunPower Dealer, to provide our solar system. They handled everything from the installation design, through the application process to the final code inspection. The code inspector said it was an excellent installation. Within one month of signing the contract we were up and operating."

- Richard in Rancho Palos Verdes

"EXTREMELY IMPRESSED!"

"Southern California Edison completed their first meter read today for the first full month with the panels in service...it is clear we'll be immediately saving hundreds of dollars every month. Thank you again for a job well done."

- Steve in Yorba Linda

"WELL WORTH TIME AND MONEY!"

"Solar Power Orange County's staff - from the first contact to the last follow-up visit - was very professional. The PV system accommodates my many computers and other appliances with no problem, and it generates more power than was originally predicted! The best thing I can say is: It just works!"

- Jerry in Irvine

Any Questions? Please give us a call: (949) 488-3207
Please let us know what your questions are, how we can help you. Remember, we are only a phone call away.

 

 
ABOUT SOLAR POWER

Photovoltaic system

"Solar park" or "PV farm"

A Photovoltaic system (informally, PV system) is an arrangement of components designed to supply usable electric power for a variety of purposes, using the Sun (or, less commonly, other light sources) as the power source.

PV systems may be built in various configurations:

  • Off-grid without battery (Array-direct)
  • Off-grid with battery storage for DC-only appliances
  • Off-grid with battery storage for AC & DC appliances
  • Grid-tie without battery
  • Grid-tie with battery storage

A photovoltaic array (also called a solar array) consists of multiple photovoltaic modules, casually referred to as solar panels, to convert solar radiation (sunlight) into usable direct current (DC) electricity. A photovoltaic system for residential, commercial, or industrial energy supply normally contains an array of photovoltaic (PV) modules, one or more DC to alternating current (AC) power converters (also known as an inverter), a racking system that supports the solar modules, electrical wiring and interconnections, and mounting for other components. Optionally, a photovoltaic system may include any or all of the following: renewable energy credit revenue-grade meter, maximum power point tracker (MPPT), battery system and charger, GPS solar tracker, energy management software, solar concentrators, solar irradiance sensors, anemometer, or task-specific accessories designed to meet specialized requirements for a system owner. The amount of modules in the system determines the total DC watts capable of being generated by the solar array; however, the inverter ultimately governs the amount of AC watts that can be distributed for consumption. For example: A PV system comprised of 11 kilowatts DC (kWDC) worth of PV modules paired with one 10 kilowatt AC (kWAC) inverter, will be limited by the maximum output of the inverter--10 kWAC.

A small PV system is capable of providing enough AC electricity to power a single home, or even an isolated device in the form of AC or DC electric. For example, military and civilian Earth observation satellites, street lights, construction and traffic signs, electric cars, solar powered tents, and electric aircraft may contain integrated photovoltaic systems to provide a primary or auxiliary power source in the form of AC or DC power, depending on the design and power demands.

Large grid-connected photovoltaic power systems are capable of providing an energy supply for multiple consumers. The electricity generated can be stored, used directly (island/standalone plant), fed into a large electricity grid powered by central generation plants (grid-connected/grid-tied plant), or combined with one, or many, domestic electricity generators to feed into a small electrical grid (hybrid plant). PV systems are generally designed in order to ensure the highest energy yield for a given investment.

In the United States, the Authority Having Jurisdiction (AHJ) will review designs and issue permits, before construction can lawfully begin. Electrical installation practices must comply with standards set forth within the National Electrical Code (NEC) and be inspected by the AHJ to ensure compliance with building code, electrical code, and fire safety code. Jurisdictions may require that equipment has been tested, certified, listed, and labeled by at least one of the Nationally Recognized Testing Laboratories (NRTL).

Components

Silicon Boule & Solar Cell

In order to make a Monocrystalline solar cell, a silicon ingot, also known as a silicon boule (crystal), must first be produced. Once a silicon ingot has been made, it is thinly sliced and semiconductors are imbedded in the disk. The silicon disk will have positive and negative leads, which serve as connection points to tie multiple cells in series. Once multiple cells are connected in series, the formation of a module begins. Other types of solar cells are available. See List of types of solar cells.

Photovoltaic modules

A photovoltaic array is a linked assembly of PV modules.
Ground mounted system
PV array on an old house

Due to the low voltage of an individual solar cell (typically ca. 0.5V), several cells are wired (see: Copper in photovoltaic power systems) in series in the manufacture of a "laminate". The laminate is assembled into a protective weatherproof enclosure, thus making a photovoltaic module or solar panel. Modules may then be strung together into a photovoltaic array.

Photovoltaic arrays

A photovoltaic array (or solar array) is a linked collection of solar panels. The power that one module can produce is seldom enough to meet requirements of a home or a business, so the modules are linked together to form an array. Most PV arrays use an inverter to convert the DC power produced by the modules into alternating current that can power lights, motors, and other loads. The modules in a PV array are usually first connected in series to obtain the desired voltage; the individual strings are then connected in parallel to allow the system to produce more current. Solar panels are typically measured under STC (standard test conditions) or PTC (PVUSA test conditions), in watts. Typical panel ratings range from less than 100 watts to over 400 watts. The array rating consists of a summation of the panel ratings, in watts, kilowatts, or megawatts.

Mounting systems

Modules are assembled into arrays on some kind of mounting system, which may be classified as ground mount, roof mount or pole mount. For solar parks a large rack is mounted on the ground, and the modules mounted on the rack. For buildings, many different racks have been devised for pitched roofs. For flat roofs, racks, bins and building integrated solutions are used.[citation needed] Solar panel racks mounted on top of poles can be stationary or moving, see Trackers below. Side-of-pole mounts are suitable for situations where a pole has something else mounted at its top, such as a light fixture or an antenna. Pole mounting raises what would otherwise be a ground mounted array above weed shadows and livestock, and may satisfy electrical code requirements regarding inaccessibility of exposed wiring. Pole mounted panels are open to more cooling air on their underside, which increases performance. A multiplicity of pole top racks can be formed into a parking carport or other shade structure. A rack which does not follow the sun from left to right may allow seasonal adjustment up or down.

Trackers

A solar tracker tilts a solar panel throughout the day. Depending on the type of tracking system, the panel is either aimed directly at the sun or the brightest area of a partly clouded sky. Trackers greatly enhance early morning and late afternoon performance, increasing the total amount of power produced by a system by about 20–25% for a single axis tracker and about 30% or more for a dual axis tracker, depending on latitude. Trackers are effective in regions that receive a large portion of sunlight directly. In diffuse light (i.e. under cloud or fog), tracking has little or no value. Because most concentrated photovoltaics systems are very sensitive to the sunlight's angle, tracking systems allow them to produce useful power for more than a brief period each day. Tracking systems improve performance for two main reasons. First, when a solar panel is perpendicular to the sunlight, it receives more light on its surface than if it were angled. Second, direct light is used more efficiently than angled light[citation needed]. Special Anti-reflective coatings can improve solar panel efficiency for direct and angled light, somewhat reducing the benefit of tracking.

Inverters

Inverter for grid connected PV

Systems designed to deliver alternating current (AC), such as grid-connected applications need an inverter to convert the direct current (DC) from the solar modules to AC. Grid connected inverters must supply AC electricity in sinusoidal form, synchronized to the grid frequency, limit feed in voltage to no higher than the grid voltage and disconnect from the grid if the grid voltage is turned off. Islanding inverters need only produce regulated voltages and frequencies in a sinusoidal waveshape as no synchronisation or co-ordination with grid supplies is required. A solar inverter may connect to a string of solar panels. In some installations a solar micro-inverter is connected at each solar panel. For safety reasons a circuit breaker is provided both on the AC and DC side to enable maintenance. AC output may be connected through an electricity meter into the public grid.

Maximum power point tracking and charge control

Maximum power point tracking (MPPT) is used to maximize module output power. The power output of a module varies as a function of the voltage in a way that power generation can be optimized by varying the system voltage to find the 'maximum power point'. Some inverters incorporate maximum power point tracking.

In the case of PV systems which include a battery, a charge controller is needed to adjust the constantly varying voltage and current available from PV panels, to correctly charge the battery. Basic charge controllers may simply turn the PV panels on and off, or may meter out pulses of energy as needed, a strategy called PWM or pulse-width modulation. More advanced charge controllers will incorporate MPPT logic into their battery charging algorithms. Charge controllers may also divert energy to some purpose other than battery charging. Rather than simply shut off the free PV energy when not needed, a user may choose to heat air or water once the battery is full.

A charge controller with MPPT capability frees the system designer from closely matching available PV voltage to battery voltage. Considerable efficiency gains can be achieved, particularly when the PV array is located at some distance from the battery. By way of example, a 150 volt PV array connected to an MPPT charge controller can be used to charge a 24 or 48 volt battery. Higher array voltage means lower array current, so the savings in wiring costs can more than pay for the controller.

Monitoring and metering

The metering must be able to accumulate energy units in both directions or two meters must be used. Many meters accumulate bidirectionally, some systems use two meters, but a unidirectional meter (with detent) will not accumulate energy from any resultant feed into the grid.

In some countries, for installations over 30kWp a frequency and a voltage monitor with disconnection of all phases is required. This is done to prevent supplying excess power to the grid, in the unusual case where more solar power is being generated than can be accommodated by the utility, and can not either be exported or stored. Grid operators historically have needed to provide transmission lines and generation capacity. Now they need to also provide storage. This is normally hydro-storage, but other means of storage are used. Initially storage was used so that baseload generators could operate at full output. With variable renewable energy, storage is needed to allow power generation whenever it is available, and consumption whenever it is needed. The two variables a grid operator have are storing electricity for when it is needed, or transmitting it to where it is needed. If both of those fail, installations over 30kWp can automatically shut down, although in practice all inverters maintain voltage regulation and stop supplying power if the load is inadequate. Grid operators have the option of curtailing excess generation from large systems, although this is more commonly done with wind power than solar power, and results in a substantial loss of revenue. Inverters have the unique option of supplying reactive power which can be advantageous in matching load requirements.

Standalone applications

Solar powered parking meter.
The solar panels on this small yacht at sea can charge the 12 volt batteries at up to 9 amperes in full, direct sunlight.

A standalone system does not have a connection to the electricity "mains" (aka "grid"). Standalone systems vary widely in size and application from wristwatches or calculators to remote buildings or spacecraft. If the load is to be supplied independently of solar insolation, the generated power is stored and buffered with a battery. In non-portable applications where weight is not an issue, such as in buildings, lead acid batteries are most commonly used for their low cost and tolerance for abuse. A charge controller may be incorporated in the system to: a) avoid battery damage by excessive charging or discharging and, b) optimizing the production of the cells or modules by maximum power point tracking (MPPT). However, in simple PV systems where the PV module voltage is matched to the battery voltage, the use of MPPT electronics is generally considered unnecessary, since the battery voltage is stable enough to provide near-maximum power collection from the PV module. In small devices (e.g. calculators, parking meters) only direct current (DC) is consumed. In larger systems (e.g. buildings, remote water pumps) AC is usually required. To convert the DC from the modules or batteries into AC, an inverter is used.

Solar vehicles

Ground, water, air or space vehicles may obtain some or all of the energy required for their operation from the sun. Surface vehicles generally require higher power levels than can be sustained by a practically sized solar array, so a battery is used to meet peak power demand, and the solar array recharges it. Space vehicles have successfully used solar photovoltaic systems for years of operation, eliminating the weight of fuel or primary batteries.

Small scale solar systems

Profile picture of a mobile solar powered generator

With a growing DIY-community and an increasing interest in environmentally friendly "green energy", some hobbyists have endeavored to build their own PV solar systems from kits or partly diy. Usually, the DIY-community uses inexpensive or high efficiency systems (such as those with solar tracking) to generate their own power. As a result, the DIY-systems often end up cheaper than their commercial counterparts. Often, the system is also hooked up into the regular power grid, using net metering instead of a battery for backup. These systems usually generate power amount of ~2 kW or less. Through the internet, the community is now able to obtain plans to construct the system (at least partly DIY) and there is a growing trend toward building them for domestic requirements. Small scale solar systems are now also being used both in developed countries and in developing countries, for residences and small businesses. One of the most cost effective solar applications is a solar powered pump, as it is far cheaper to purchase a solar panel than it is to run power lines.

Grid-connected applications

Diagram of a residential grid-connected PV system

A grid connected system is connected to a larger independent grid (typically the public electricity grid) and feeds energy directly into the grid. This energy may be shared by a residential or commercial building before or after the revenue measurement point. The difference being whether the credited energy production is calculated independently of the customer's energy consumption (feed-in tariff) or only on the difference of energy (net metering). Grid connected systems vary in size from residential (2-10kWp) to solar power stations (up to 10s of MWp). This is a form of decentralized electricity generation. The feeding of electricity into the grid requires the transformation of DC into AC by a special, synchronising grid-tie inverter. In kW sized installations the DC side system voltage is as high as permitted (typically 1000V except US residential 600V) to limit ohmic losses. Most modules (72 crystalline silicon cells) generate 160W to 300W at 36 volts. It is sometimes necessary or desirable to connect the modules partially in parallel rather than all in series. One set of modules connected in series is known as a 'string'.

Connection to DC grids

DC grids are found in electric powered transport: railways trams and trolleybuses. A few pilot plants for such applications have been built, such as the tram depots in Hannover Leinhausen, using photovoltaic contributors and Geneva (Bachet de Pesay). The 150 kWp Geneva site feeds 600V DC directly into the tram/trolleybus electricity network whereas before it provided about 15% of the electricity at its opening in 1999.

Building-mounted and building-integrated systems

In urban and suburban areas, photovoltaic arrays are commonly used on rooftops to supplement power use; often the building will have a connection to the power grid, in which case the energy produced by the PV array can be sold back to the utility in some sort of net metering agreement. Some utilities, such as Solvay Electric in Solvay, NY, use the rooftops of commercial customers and telephone poles to support their use of PV panels. Solar trees are arrays that, as the name implies, mimic the look of trees, provide shade, and at night can function as street lights. In agricultural settings, the array may be used to directly power DC pumps, without the need for an inverter. In remote settings such as mountainous areas, islands, or other places where a power grid is unavailable, solar arrays can be used as the sole source of electricity, usually by charging a storage battery.[citation needed] There is financial support available for people wishing to install PV arrays. Incentives range from federal tax credits to state tax credits and rebates to utility loans and rebates. A listing of current incentives can be found at the Database of State Incentives for Renewables and Efficiency. In the UK, households are paid a 'Feedback Fee' to buy excess electricity at a flat rate per kWh. This is up to 44.3p/kWh which can allow a home to earn double their usual annual domestic electricity bill. The current UK feed-in tariff system is due for review on 31 March 2012, after which the current scheme may no longer be available.[need quotation to verify]

Power plants

A photovoltaic power station (solar park or solar farm) is a power station using photovoltaic modules and inverters for utility scale electricity generation, connected to an electricity transmission grid. Some large photovoltaic power stations like Waldpolenz Solar Park and Topaz Solar Farm cover tens or hundreds of hectares and have power outputs up to hundreds of megawatts.

System performance

Insolation and energy

Solar insolation is made up of direct radiation, diffuse radiation and reflected radiation (or albedo). At high noon on a cloudless day at the equator, the power of the sun is about 1 kW/m², on the Earth's surface, to a plane that is perpendicular to the sun's rays. As such, PV arrays can track the sun through each day to greatly enhance energy collection. However, tracking devices add cost, and require maintenance, so it is more common for PV arrays to have fixed mounts that tilt the array and face solar noon (approximately due south in the Northern Hemisphere or due north in the Southern Hemisphere). The tilt angle, from horizontal, can be varied for season, but if fixed, should be set to give optimal array output during the peak electrical demand portion of a typical year for a stand alone system. This optimal module tilt angle is not necessarily identical to the tilt angle for maximum annual array energy output. The optimization of the a photovoltaic system for a specific environment can be complicated as issues of solar flux, soiling, and snow losses should be taken into effect. In addition, recent work has shown that spectral effects can play a role in optimal photovoltaic material selection. For example, the spectral albedo can play a significant role in output depending on the surface around the photovoltaic system.

For the weather and latitudes of the United States and Europe, typical insolation ranges from 4 kWh/m²/day in northern climes to 6.5 kWh/m²/day in the sunniest regions. Typical solar panels have an average efficiency of 15%, with the best commercially available panels at 21%. Thus, a photovoltaic installation in the southern latitudes of Europe or the United States may expect to produce 1 kWh/m²/day. A typical "150 watt" solar panel is about a square meter in size. Such a panel may be expected to produce 0.75 kWh every day, on average, after taking into account the weather and the latitude, for an insolation of 5 sun hours/day. A typical 1 kW photovoltaic installation in Australia or the southern latitudes of Europe or United States, may produce 3.5-5 kWh per day, dependent on location, orientation, tilt, insolation and other factors. In the Sahara desert, with less cloud cover and a better solar angle, one could ideally obtain closer to 8.3 kWh/m²/day provided the nearly ever present wind would not blow sand onto the units. The area of the Sahara desert is over 9 million km². 90,600 km², or about 1%, could generate as much electricity as all of the world's power plants combined.

Tracking the sun

Trackers and sensors to optimise the performance are often seen as optional, but tracking systems can increase viable output by up to 45%. PV arrays that approach or exceed one megawatt often use solar trackers. Accounting for clouds, and the fact that most of the world is not on the equator, and that the sun sets in the evening, the correct measure of solar power is insolation – the average number of kilowatt-hours per square meter per day. For the weather and latitudes of the United States and Europe, typical insolation ranges from 2.26 kWh/m²/day in northern climes to 5.61 kWh/m²/day in the sunniest regions.

For large systems, the energy gained by using tracking systems can outweigh the added complexity (trackers can increase efficiency by 30% or more). For very large systems, the added maintenance of tracking is a substantial detriment. Tracking is not required for flat panel and low concentration concentrated photovoltaic systems. For high concentration concentrated photovoltaic systems, dual axis tracking is a necessity.

Pricing trends affect the balance between adding more stationary solar panels versus having fewer panels that track. When solar panel prices drop, trackers become a less attractive option.

Shading and dirt

Photovoltaic cell electrical output is extremely sensitive to shading. The effects of this shading are well known. When even a small portion of a cell, module, or array is shaded, while the remainder is in sunlight, the output falls dramatically due to internal 'short-circuiting' (the electrons reversing course through the shaded portion of the p-n junction). If the current drawn from the series string of cells is no greater than the current that can be produced by the shaded cell, the current (and so power) developed by the string is limited. If enough voltage is available from the rest of the cells in a string, current will be forced through the cell by breaking down the junction in the shaded portion. This breakdown voltage in common cells is between 10 and 30 volts. Instead of adding to the power produced by the panel, the shaded cell absorbs power, turning it into heat. Since the reverse voltage of a shaded cell is much greater than the forward voltage of an illuminated cell, one shaded cell can absorb the power of many other cells in the string, disproportionately affecting panel output. For example, a shaded cell may drop 8 volts, instead of adding 0.5 volts, at a particular current level, thereby absorbing the power produced by 16 other cells. It is, thus important that a PV installation is not shaded by trees or other obstructions. Several methods have been developed to determine shading losses from trees to PV systems over both large regions using LiDAR, but also at an individual system level using sketchup. Most modules have bypass diodes between each cell or string of cells that minimize the effects of shading and only lose the power of the shaded portion of the array. The main job of the bypass diode is to eliminate hot spots that form on cells that can cause further damage to the array, and cause fires. Sunlight can be absorbed by dust, snow, or other impurities at the surface of the module. This can reduce the light that strikes the cells. In general these losses aggregated over the year are small even for locations in Canada. Maintaining a clean module surface will increase output performance over the life of the module. Google found that cleaning the flat mounted solar panels after 15 months increased their output by almost 100%, but that the 5% tilted arrays were adequately cleaned by rainwater.

Temperature

Module output and life are also degraded by increased temperature. Allowing ambient air to flow over, and if possible behind, PV modules reduces this problem.

Module efficiency

In 2012, solar panels available for consumers can have an efficiency of up to about 17%, while commercially available panels can go as far as 27%.

Monitoring

Photovoltaic systems need to be monitored to detect breakdown and optimize their operation. Several photovoltaic monitoring strategies depending on the output of the installation and its nature. Monitoring can be performed on site or remotely. It can measure production only, retrieve all the data from the inverter or retrieve all of the data from the communicating equipment (probes, meters, etc.). Monitoring tools can be dedicated to supervision only or offer additional functions. Individual inverters and battery charge controllers may include monitoring using manufacturer specific protocols and software. Energy metering of an inverter may be of limited accuracy and not suitable for revenue metering purposes. A third-party data acquisition system can monitor multiple inverters, using the inverter manufacturer's protocols, and also acquire weather-related information. Independent smart meters may measure the total energy production of a PV array system. Separate measures such as satellite image analysis or a solar radiation meter (a pyranometer) can be used to estimate total insolation for comparison. Data collected from a monitoring system can be displayed remotely over the World Wide Web. For example, the Open Solar Outdoors Test Field (OSOTF) is a grid-connected photovoltaic test system, which continuously monitors the output of a number of photovoltaic modules and correlates their performance to a long list of highly accurate meteorological readings. The OSOTF is organized under open source principles—All data and analysis is be made freely available to the entire photovoltaic community and the general public. The Fraunhofer Center for Sustainable Energy Systems maintains two test systems, one in Massachusetts, and the Outdoor Solar Test Field OTF-1 in Albuquerque, New Mexico, which opened in June 2012. A third site, OTF-2, also in Albuquerque, is under construction. Some companies offer analysis software to analyze system performance. Small residential systems may have minimal data analysis requirements other than perhaps total energy production; larger grid-connected power plants can benefit from more detailed investigations of performance.

Performance factors

Uncertainties in revenue over time relate mostly to the evaluation of the solar resource and to the performance of the system itself. In the best of cases, uncertainties are typically 4% for year-to-year climate variability, 5% for solar resource estimation (in a horizontal plane), 3% for estimation of irradiation in the plane of the array, 3% for power rating of modules, 2% for losses due to dirt and soiling, 1.5% for losses due to snow, and 5% for other sources of error. Identifying and reacting to manageable losses is critical for revenue and O&M efficiency. Monitoring of array performance may be part of contractual agreements between the array owner, the builder, and the utility purchasing the energy produced.[citation needed] Recently, a method to create "synthetic days" using readily available weather data and verification using the Open Solar Outdoors Test Field make it possible to predict photovoltaic systems performance with high degrees of accuracy. This method can be used to then determine loss mechanisms on a local scale - such as those from snow or the effects of surface coatings (e.g. hydrophobic or hydrophilic) on soiling or snow losses. Access to the Internet has allowed a further improvement in energy monitoring and communication. Dedicated systems are available from a number of vendors. For solar PV system that use microinverters (panel-level DC to AC conversion), module power data is automatically provided. Some systems allow setting performance alerts that trigger phone/email/text warnings when limits are reached. These solutions provide data for the system owner and the installer. Installers are able to remotely monitor multiple installations, and see at-a-glance the status of their entire installed base.[citation needed]

Module life

Effective module lives are typically 25 years or more. The payback period for an investment in a PV solar installation varies greatly and is typically less useful than a calculation of return on investment. While it is typically calculated to be between 10 and 20 years, the payback period can be far shorter with incentives.

Hybrid systems

Hybrid Power System.gif

A hybrid system combines PV with other forms of generation, usually a diesel generator. Biogas is also used. The other form of generation may be a type able to modulate power output as a function of demand. However more than one renewable form of energy may be used e.g. wind. The photovoltaic power generation serves to reduce the consumption of non renewable fuel. Hybrid systems are most often found on islands. Pellworm island in Germany and Kythnos island in Greece are notable examples (both are combined with wind). The Kythnos plant has reduced diesel consumption by 11.2%

There has also been recent work showing that the PV penetration limit can be increased by deploying a distributed network of PV+CHP hybrid systems in the U.S. The temporal distribution of solar flux, electrical and heating requirements for representative U.S. single family residences were analyzed and the results clearly show that hybridizing CHP with PV can enable additional PV deployment above what is possible with a conventional centralized electric generation system. This theory was reconfirmed with numerical simulations using per second solar flux data to determine that the necessary battery backup to provide for such a hybrid system is possible with relatively small and inexpensive battery systems. In addition, large PV+CHP systems are possible for institutional buildings, which again provide back up for intermittent PV and reduce CHP runtime.

Standardization

Increasing use of photovoltaic systems and integration of photovoltaic power into existing structures and techniques of supply and distribution increases the value of general standards and definitions for photovoltaic components and systems.[citation needed] The standards are compiled at the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) and apply to efficiency, durability and safety of cells, modules, simulation programs, plug connectors and cables, mounting systems, overall efficiency of inverters etc.

Costs and economy

Costs of production have been reduced in recent years for more widespread use through production and technological advances. For large-scale installations, prices below $1.00 per watt are now common. Crystal silicon solar cells have largely been replaced by less expensive multicrystalline silicon solar cells, and thin film silicon solar cells have also been developed recently at lower costs of production. Although they are reduced in energy conversion efficiency from single crystalline "siwafers", they are also much easier to produce at comparably lower costs.

Energy costs

The table below shows the total cost in US cents per kWh of electricity generated by a photovoltaic system. The row headings on the left show the total cost, per peak kilowatt (kWp), of a photovoltaic installation. Photovoltaic system costs have been declining and in Germany, for example, were reported to have fallen to USD 2200/kWp by the second quarter of 2012. The column headings across the top refer to the annual energy output in kWh expected from each installed kWp. This varies by geographic region because the average insolation depends on the average cloudiness and the thickness of atmosphere traversed by the sunlight. It also depends on the path of the sun relative to the panel and the horizon. Panels are usually mounted at an angle based on latitude, and often they are adjusted seasonally to meet the changing solar declination. Solar tracking can also be utilized to access even more perpendicular sunlight, thereby raising the total energy output.

The calculated values in the table reflect the total cost in cents per kWh produced. They assume a 10% total capital cost (for instance 4% interest rate, 1% operating and maintenance cost, and depreciation of the capital outlay over 20 years). Normally, photovoltaic modules have a 25 year warranty.

Cost per kilowatt hour (US cents/kWh)
20 years 2400
kWh/kWp y
2200
kWh/kWp y
2000
kWh/kWp y
1800
kWh/kWp y
1600
kWh/kWp y
1400
kWh/kWp y
1200
kWh/kWp y
1000
kWh/kWp y
800
kWh/kWp y
$200 /kWp 0.8 0.9 1.0 1.1 1.3 1.4 1.7 2.0 2.5
$600 /kWp 2.5 2.7 3.0 3.3 3.8 4.3 5.0 6.0 7.5
$1000 /kWp 4.2 4.5 5.0 5.6 6.3 7.1 8.3 10.0 12.5
$1400 /kWp 5.8 6.4 7.0 7.8 8.8 10.0 11.7 14.0 17.5
$1800 /kWp 7.5 8.2 9.0 10.0 11.3 12.9 15.0 18.0 22.5
$2200 /kWp 9.2 10.0 11.0 12.2 13.8 15.7 18.3 22.0 27.5
$2600 /kWp 10.8 11.8 13.0 14.4 16.3 18.6 21.7 26.0 32.5
$3000 /kWp 12.5 13.6 15.0 16.7 18.8 21.4 25.0 30.0 37.5

Regulation

United Kingdom

In the UK, PV installations are generally considered permitted development and don't require planning permission. If the property is listed or in a designated area (National Park, Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty, Site of Special Scientific Interest or Norfolk Broads) then planning permission is required.

United States

In the US Many localities require a license to install a photovoltaic system. A grid-tied system normally requires a licensed electrician to make the connection between the system and the grid-connected wiring of the building.

The State of California prohibits Homeowners' associations from restricting solar devices.

External links


 
ABOUT ORANGE COUNTY CALIFORNIA

Orange County is a county in Southern California, United States. Its county seat is Santa Ana. According to the 2000 Census, its population was 2,846,289, making it the second most populous county in the state of California, and the fifth most populous in the United States. The state of California estimates its population as of 2007 to be 3,098,121 people, dropping its rank to third, behind San Diego County. Thirty-four incorporated cities are located in Orange County; the newest is Aliso Viejo.

Unlike many other large centers of population in the United States, Orange County uses its county name as its source of identification whereas other places in the country are identified by the large city that is closest to them. This is because there is no defined center to Orange County like there is in other areas which have one distinct large city. Five Orange County cities have populations exceeding 170,000 while no cities in the county have populations surpassing 360,000. Seven of these cities are among the 200 largest cities in the United States.

Orange County is also famous as a tourist destination, as the county is home to such attractions as Disneyland and Knott's Berry Farm, as well as sandy beaches for swimming and surfing, yacht harbors for sailing and pleasure boating, and extensive area devoted to parks and open space for golf, tennis, hiking, kayaking, cycling, skateboarding, and other outdoor recreation. It is at the center of Southern California's Tech Coast, with Irvine being the primary business hub.

The average price of a home in Orange County is $541,000. Orange County is the home of a vast number of major industries and service organizations. As an integral part of the second largest market in America, this highly diversified region has become a Mecca for talented individuals in virtually every field imaginable. Indeed the colorful pageant of human history continues to unfold here; for perhaps in no other place on earth is there an environment more conducive to innovative thinking, creativity and growth than this exciting, sun bathed valley stretching between the mountains and the sea in Orange County.

Orange County was Created March 11 1889, from part of Los Angeles County, and, according to tradition, so named because of the flourishing orange culture. Orange, however, was and is a commonplace name in the United States, used originally in honor of the Prince of Orange, son-in-law of King George II of England.

Incorporated: March 11, 1889
Legislative Districts:
* Congressional: 38th-40th, 42nd & 43
* California Senate: 31st-33rd, 35th & 37
* California Assembly: 58th, 64th, 67th, 69th, 72nd & 74

County Seat: Santa Ana
County Information:
Robert E. Thomas Hall of Administration
10 Civic Center Plaza, 3rd Floor, Santa Ana 92701
Telephone: (714)834-2345 Fax: (714)834-3098
County Government Website: http://www.oc.ca.gov

CITIES OF ORANGE COUNTY CALIFORNIA:

City of Aliso Viejo, 92653, 92656, 92698
City of Anaheim, 92801, 92802, 92803, 92804, 92805, 92806, 92807, 92808, 92809, 92812, 92814, 92815, 92816, 92817, 92825, 92850, 92899
City of Brea, 92821, 92822, 92823
City of Buena Park, 90620, 90621, 90622, 90623, 90624
City of Costa Mesa, 92626, 92627, 92628
City of Cypress, 90630
City of Dana Point, 92624, 92629
City of Fountain Valley, 92708, 92728
City of Fullerton, 92831, 92832, 92833, 92834, 92835, 92836, 92837, 92838
City of Garden Grove, 92840, 92841, 92842, 92843, 92844, 92845, 92846
City of Huntington Beach, 92605, 92615, 92646, 92647, 92648, 92649
City of Irvine, 92602, 92603, 92604, 92606, 92612, 92614, 92616, 92618, 92619, 92620, 92623, 92650, 92697, 92709, 92710
City of La Habra, 90631, 90632, 90633
City of La Palma, 90623
City of Laguna Beach, 92607, 92637, 92651, 92652, 92653, 92654, 92656, 92677, 92698
City of Laguna Hills, 92637, 92653, 92654, 92656
City of Laguna Niguel
, 92607, 92677
City of Laguna Woods, 92653, 92654
City of Lake Forest, 92609, 92630, 92610
City of Los Alamitos, 90720, 90721
City of Mission Viejo, 92675, 92690, 92691, 92692, 92694
City of Newport Beach, 92657, 92658, 92659, 92660, 92661, 92662, 92663
City of Orange, 92856, 92857, 92859, 92861, 92862, 92863, 92864, 92865, 92866, 92867, 92868, 92869
City of Placentia, 92870, 92871
City of Rancho Santa Margarita, 92688, 92679
City of San Clemente, 92672, 92673, 92674
City of San Juan Capistrano, 92675, 92690, 92691, 92692, 92693, 92694
City of Santa Ana, 92701, 92702, 92703, 92704, 92705, 92706, 92707, 92708, 92711, 92712, 92725, 92728, 92735, 92799
City of Seal Beach, 90740
City of Stanton, 90680
City of Tustin, 92780, 92781, 92782
City of Villa Park, 92861, 92867
City of Westminster, 92683, 92684, 92685
City of Yorba Linda, 92885, 92886, 92887

Noteworthy communities Some of the communities that exist within city limits are listed below: * Anaheim Hills, Anaheim * Balboa Island, Newport Beach * Corona del Mar, Newport Beach * Crystal Cove / Pelican Hill, Newport Beach * Capistrano Beach, Dana Point * El Modena, Orange * French Park, Santa Ana * Floral Park, Santa Ana * Foothill Ranch, Lake Forest * Monarch Beach, Dana Point * Nellie Gail, Laguna Hills * Northwood, Irvine * Woodbridge, Irvine * Newport Coast, Newport Beach * Olive, Orange * Portola Hills, Lake Forest * San Joaquin Hills, Laguna Niguel * San Joaquin Hills, Newport Beach * Santa Ana Heights, Newport Beach * Tustin Ranch, Tustin * Talega, San Clemente * West Garden Grove, Garden Grove * Yorba Hills, Yorba Linda * Mesa Verde, Costa Mesa

Unincorporated communities These communities are outside of the city limits in unincorporated county territory: * Coto de Caza * El Modena * Ladera Ranch * Las Flores * Midway City * Orange Park Acres * Rossmoor * Silverado Canyon * Sunset Beach * Surfside * Trabuco Canyon * Tustin Foothills

Adjacent counties to Orange County Are: * Los Angeles County, California - north, west * San Bernardino County, California - northeast * Riverside County, California - east * San Diego County, California - southeast



 
ABOUT MISSION VIEJO
City of Mission Viejo
—  City  —
The Saddleback Mountains and Lake Mission Viejo

Seal
Motto: "Make Living Your Mission"
Location of Mission Viejo within Orange County, California.
Area
 • Total 18.123 sq mi (46.939 km2)
 • Land 17.739 sq mi (45.944 km2)
 • Water 0.384 sq mi (0.995 km2)  2.12%
Elevation 397-500 ft (121 m)
Population (2011)
 • Total 93,483
 • Density Bad rounding here5,200/sq mi (Bad rounding here2,000/km2)
Time zone PST (UTC-8)
 • Summer (DST) PDT (UTC-7)
Zip Code 92690, 92691, 92692, 92694
Area code(s) 949
FIPS code 06-48256
GNIS feature ID 1661045
Website City of Mission Viejo California Website

Mission Viejo is a city located in southern Orange County, California, U.S. in the Saddleback Valley. Mission Viejo is considered one of the largest master-planned communities ever built under a single project in the United States, and is rivaled only by Highlands Ranch, Colorado, in its size. The city has a 2011 estimated population of 93,483,

Mission Viejo is suburban in nature and culture. The city is mainly residential, although there are a number of offices and businesses within its city limits. The city is known for its picturesque tree-lined neighborhoods, receiving recognition from the National Arbor Day Foundation. The city's name is a reference to Rancho Mission Viejo, a large Spanish land grant from which the community was founded.

Mission Viejo was named the safest city in the United States in a 2007 Morgan Quitno crime statistic survey (compiled from FBI data). In 2009, it was named the safest city in California and third safest in the nation, according to CQ Press.

History

Mission Viejo was a hilly region primarily used as cattle and sheep grazing land, since it was of little use to farmers. This city was one of the last regions of Orange County to be urbanized due to its geologic complexity. Mission Viejo was purchased by John Forster, a Mexican also known as Don Juan. During the Mexican-American War, Foster provided fresh horses to United States military forces which were used on the march of San Diego to retake Los Angeles.

In 1960, early developers dismissed most of the land in Mission Viejo as simply "undevelopable". Donald Bren, an urban planner who later became the president of the Irvine Company, drafted a master plan which placed roads in the valleys and houses on the hills, and contoured to the geography of the area. The plan worked, and by 1980 much of the city of Mission Viejo was completed. During the late 1970s and the 1980s, houses in Mission Viejo were in such high demand that housing tracts often sold out before construction even began on them. The houses and shopping centers in the city are almost uniformly designed in a Spanish mission style, with "adobe"-like stucco walls and barrel-tile roofs. Many point to Mission Viejo as the first and largest manifestation of Bren's obsession with Spanish architecture. Bren's company was also the creator of the developments in Irvine, and Newport Beach suburbs. The company expanded its operations and went on to build the Lakes project in Tempe Arizona, Mission Viejo Aurora in Colorado and was the initial master planner of Highlands Ranch, both in the Denver Metropolitan area.

The seal of the city of Mission Viejo was designed and drawn by Carl Glassford, an artist and former resident of the city.

Geography

Mission Viejo is located at (33.612739, -117.656038).

According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 18.1 square miles (47 km2). 17.7 square miles (46 km2) of it is land and 0.4 square miles (1.0 km2) of it (2.12%) is water. A significant portion of the surface water is held in Lake Mission Viejo, an artificial lake stretching approximately one mile from Olympiad Road to Alicia Parkway along Marguerite Parkway.

It is bordered by Lake Forest on the northwest, Trabuco Canyon on the northeast, Rancho Santa Margarita and Ladera Ranch on the east, San Juan Capistrano on the south, and Laguna Niguel and Laguna Hills on the west.

Climate

Mission Viejo enjoys a borderline semi-arid/Mediterranean climate (Köppen climate classification BSh/Csa), with mild temperatures and plentiful sunshine year-round. Rainfall totals, which average around 14 inches (355 millimetres) annually are focused primarily in the months from November to March. Summer is very dry and virtually rainless, however thunderstorms do rarely occur. Due to the city's proximity to the ocean, nighttime and morning clouds are fairly common, especially in the months of May and June, a weather phenomenon commonly known as June Gloom.

Like most of Southern California, the city is prone to dry Santa Ana winds, which bring hot air from inland and punctuate the normally mild temperatures with noticeable jumps. For example, temperatures have reached highs of 90°F (32°C) and above throughout many months of the year, occasionally into the autumn months. Snowfall within city limits is very rare, however the nearby Saddleback Mountains receive a dusting of snow every few winters.

Demographics

Historical populations
Census Pop.
1970 11,933
1980 50,666 324.6%
1990 72,820 43.7%
2000 93,102 27.9%
2010 93,305 0.2%
source:

2010

The 2010 United States Census reported that Mission Viejo had a population of 93,305. The population density was 5,148.3 people per square mile (1,987.8/km²). The racial makeup of Mission Viejo was 74,493 (79.8%) White, 1,210 (1.3%) African American, 379 (0.4%) Native American, 8,462 (9.1%) Asian, 153 (0.2%) Pacific Islander, 4,332 (4.6%) from other races, and 4,276 (4.6%) from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 15,877 persons (17.0%).

The Census reported that 92,363 people (99.0% of the population) lived in households, 859 (0.9%) lived in non-institutionalized group quarters, and 83 (0.1%) were institutionalized.

There were 33,208 households, out of which 11,767 (35.4%) had children under the age of 18 living in them, 20,792 (62.6%) were opposite-sex married couples living together, 2,967 (8.9%) had a female householder with no husband present, 1,306 (3.9%) had a male householder with no wife present. There were 1,211 (3.6%) unmarried opposite-sex partnerships, and 225 (0.7%) same-sex married couples or partnerships. 6,314 households (19.0%) were made up of individuals and 2,949 (8.9%) had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.78. There were 25,065 families (75.5% of all households); the average family size was 3.18.

The population was spread out with 21,270 people (22.8%) under the age of 18, 7,852 people (8.4%) aged 18 to 24, 21,648 people (23.2%) aged 25 to 44, 29,003 people (31.1%) aged 45 to 64, and 13,532 people (14.5%) who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 42.2 years. For every 100 females there were 95.4 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 92.2 males.

The median household income was $96,420, with 4.9% of residents living below poverty. 94.1% of residents held at least a high school diploma, while 44% held a bachelor's degree or higher.

There were 34,228 housing units at an average density of 1,888.6 per square mile (729.2/km²), of which 25,859 (77.9%) were owner-occupied, and 7,349 (22.1%) were occupied by renters. The homeowner vacancy rate was 0.9%; the rental vacancy rate was 4.9%. 72,390 people (77.6% of the population) lived in owner-occupied housing units and 19,973 people (21.4%) lived in rental housing units.

2000

At the 2000 census, there were 93,102 people, 32,449 households and 25,212 families residing in the city. The population density was 4,990.1 inhabitants per square mile (1,926.4/km²). There were 32,986 housing units at an average density of 1,767.9 per square mile (682.5/km²). The racial makeup of the city was 79.7% white, 1.6% African American, 0.4% Native American, 8.3% Asian, 0.1% Pacific Islander, 6.2% from other races, and 3.7% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 15.9% of the population. There were 32,449 households out of which 39.7% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 66.1% were married couples living together, 8.1% had a female householder with no husband present, and 22.3% were non-families. 17.3% of all households were made up of individuals and 6.0% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.84 and the average family size was 3.22.

Age distribution was 27.1% under the age of 18, 6.6% from 18 to 24, 30.5% from 25 to 44, 24.9% from 45 to 64, and 10.9% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 38 years. For every 100 females there were 95.7 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 91.7 males.

According to a 2008 estimate, the median household income was $93,330, and the median family income was $113,439. Males had a median income of $74,703 versus $53,196 for females. The per capita income for the city was $41,459. 1.9% of families and 4.4% of the population were below the poverty line, including 5.1% of those under age 18 and 6% of those age 65 or over.

Recreation and services

Mission Hospital is the largest hospital in south Orange County and serves as the area's regional trauma center. It also offers one of two Children's Hospital of Orange County locations providing care for children.

Mission Viejo has numerous recreational areas such as the Norman P. Murray Community and Senior Center there are about two parks per square mile. The city has three golf courses, The Mission Viejo Country Club, Casta del Sol Golf Course, and the Arroyo Trabuco Golf Club. At the center of the city is a man-made lake, Lake Mission Viejo, a private association for Mission Viejo residents with custom waterfront homes, condominiums, boat rentals, and swim beaches.

Economy

According to the City's 2010 Comprehensive Annual Financial Report, the top employers in the city were:

# Employer # of employees
1 Saddleback College 2,196
2 Mission Hospital 1,349
3 Unisys 1,000
4 Quest Diagnostics 500
5 Coldwell Banker 410
6 Saddleback Valley Unified School District 400

Marie Callender's has its corporate headquarters in the Marie Callender's Corporate Support Center in Mission Viejo.

Sports

Mission Viejo has a major youth athletic facility, Mission Viejo Youth Athletic Park. The park consists of eight baseball fields and five soccer fields. It is host to Little League District 68 [2], AYSO Region 84 [3] and four competitive soccer clubs: Pateadores Soccer Club, Mission Viejo Soccer Club, West Coast Futbol Club, and Saddleback United Soccer Club.

The Mission Viejo Nadadores Swimming and Mission Viejo Nadadores Diving Team won a string of national championships and produced a number of Olympians and world record holders in the 1970s and 1980s. Olympians included Shirley Babashoff, Brian Goodell, Larson Jenson, Maryanne Graham, Nicole Kramer, Casy Converse, Marcia Morey, Dara Torres, and Greg Louganis.

Mission Viejo hosted the Road Cycling Events during the 1984 Summer Olympics held in Los Angeles. The old O'Neill Road was renamed Olympiad Rd. in honor of the Olympic events in 1984.

There is also a soccer facility, now used by the town's youth soccer program, that was used as a training field by the United States men's national soccer team before and during the 1994 FIFA World Cup, hosted by the United States. Mission Viejo is the largest AYSO Region in the country.

The Saddleback College ballpark hosted the Mission Viejo Vigilantes minor league baseball team of the Western Baseball League from 1996-2001. Now the ballpark has a semi-pro collegiate team, the Orange County Fire.

Mission Viejo is also the hometown of New York Jets quarterback Mark Sánchez, New York Yankees pitcher Phil Hughes, and Washington Nationals first baseman Adam LaRoche, former Milwaukee Brewers pitcher Don August, Saint Louis Cardinals outfielder Allen Craig, Top Shot Season 4 Champion Chris Cheng, and PBA Tour Champion Scott Norton.

Education

Mission Viejo is served by two school districts, the Capistrano Unified School District and Saddleback Valley Unified School Districts. Capistrano Unified serves the eastern, northeastern, and southern portions of the city with eight schools. As of 2006, all high school students in the Capistrano Unified portion of Mission Viejo attend Capistrano Valley High School. Students from western Mission Viejo (north of Oso Parkway and west of Marguerite until Alicia Parkway) attend Saddleback Valley's Mission Viejo High School. Far northern Mission Viejo attends Saddleback Valley's Trabuco Hills High School, though most of that school has students from Rancho Santa Margarita and Lake Forest. A few residents attend Tesoro High School in Las Flores or the private Santa Margarita Catholic High School in Rancho Santa Margarita.

Silverado High School, Mira Monte High School, and Pathfinder are continuation and adult schools within the city. Silverado High School provides a day school environment while Mira Monte, which shares the same campus, is strictly independent study.

Saddleback College, near The Shops at Mission Viejo and Capistrano Valley High School, is a large community college in the southern half of the city. In addition, the University of California, Irvine, Chapman University, Soka University of America, and California State University, Fullerton (Irvine Campus), are nearby in adjacent cities.

La Tierra Elementary shut down in June 2009 due to budget cuts. It was chosen due to its small size and minimal student body. The school will remain closed until further notice. Mission Viejo residents refer to La Tierra as "The Little School With a Big Heart." Students there are reassigned to Del Cerro Elementary.

O'Neill Elementary, the city's first elementary school, closed in June 2009 also due to budget cuts in SVUSD. Students in the Deane Home community surrounding the school will be moved to nearby De Portola Elementary. Students living in the homes north of the lake will be moved to Melinda Heights Elementary in Rancho Santa Margarita.

Elementary

Capistrano Unified

Saddleback Valley Unified

Private

Middle school

High school

College

Notable people

External links


 

"An honest answer is the sign of true friendship."

We receive many customers from across the world including people from the following cities:

Aliso Viejo 92656, 92698, Anaheim 92801, 92802, 92803, 92804, 92805, 92806, 92807, 92808, 92809, 92812, 92814, 92815, 92816, 92817, 92825, 92850, 92899, Atwood, 92811, Brea, 92821, 92822,92823, Buena Park, 90620 ,90621,90622, 90624, Capistrano Beach, 92624, Corona del Mar, 92625, Costa Mesa, 92626, 92627, 92628, Cypress, 90630, Dana Point, 92629, East Irvine, 92650, El Toro, 92609, Foothill Ranch, 92610, Fountain Valley, 92708, 92728, Fullerton, 92831, 92832, 92833, 92834, 92835, 92836, 92837, 92838, Garden Grove, 92840, 92841, 92842, 92843 ,92844, 92845, 92846, Huntington Beach , 92605, 92615, 92646, 92647, 92648, 92649, Irvine, 92602, 92603, 92604, 92606, 92612, 92614, 92616, 92617, 92618, 92619, 92620, 92623, 92697, La Habra, 90631, 90632, 90633, La Palma, 90623, Ladera Ranch, 92694, Laguna Beach , 92651, 92652, Laguna Hills ,92653, 92654,92607,92677, Laguna Woods, 92637, Lake Forest, 92630, Los Alamitos, 90720, 90721, Midway City, 92655, Mission Viejo, 92690, 92691, 92692,Newport Beach , 92658, 92659, 92660, 92661, 92662, 92663, 92657,
Orange, 92856, 92857, 92859, 92862, 92863, 92864, 92865, 92866, 92867, 92868, 92869, Placentia, 92870, 92871, Rancho Santa Margarita 92688, San Clemente, 92672, 92673, 92674, San Juan Capistrano, 92675, 92693,
Santa Ana , 92701, 92702, 92703, 92704, 92705 ,92706, 92707, 92711, 92712, 92725.92735, 92799, Seal Beach , 90740, Silverado 92676, Stanton, 90680, Sunset Beach 90742, Surfside 90743, Trabuco Canyon, 92678, 92679,Tustin ,92780, 92781,92782, Villa Park, 92861,Westminster, 92683, 92684, 92685, Yorba Linda, 92885, 92886, 92887

This Institution was Awarded
Best Value in Solar Energy

Orange County CA, Visit: OrangeCountyCABusinessDirectory.com


Solar Power Orange County
Call (949) 488-3207



Website: SolarPowerOrangeCountyCA.com

� 2013 Solar Power Orange County, 23632 Via Fabricante, Suite F, Suite D, Fullerton, California 92831


SOLAR POWER ORANGE COUNTY, SOLAR POWER ORANGE COUNTY CA, ORANGE COUNTY SOLAR POWER ENERGY, FREE SOLAR POWER, Residential Solar Power, Commercial Solar Power, Solar Power Systems, Mission Viejo, Orange County, Solar Power Systems Residential, Solar Energy, Free Solar Energy, Solar Power Systems For Homes, Solar Power Orange County, Zero Down Solar Systems, Solar Panel Installation, Solar Pannels, Buy Solar, Free Energy, Free Electricity, Alternative Energy, Solar, Panels, Power, Sun, Green Energy, CA
education
Solar Power, Solar Panels, Alternate Energy, System Monitoring

ZERO DOWN SOLAR POWER MADE EASY!
Solar Power Orange County